Using the Sand Tray to Detect Family Roles

My Play Therapy Page

Here’s another interesting article submitted by reader Martha Nodar on the subject of sand tray therapy. Ms. Nodar earned a gift certificate to childtherapytoys.com for her submission. Learn how you can do the same!

Bradshaw (1988) argues families are systems with systemic needs which are typically fulfilled, mostly unconsciously, by family members. These family members may become unwitting participants drawn into the family drama. In dysfunctional families triangles are common because they serve the purpose of providing a relief to the drama. In such cases, children and adolescents may unconsciously adopt roles within their family in order to survive their environment and help bring some balance to the scene. For instance, a so-called difficult child may be unconsciously acting-out the unspoken tensions within the parental dyad (Kerr & Bowen, 1988). Fairy tales have a way of representing these family dynamics in a way that is both nonthreatening and entertaining. Sandtray…

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Creating Labyrinths In The Sand

My Play Therapy Page

Here’s another great intervention idea submitted by reader Martha Nodar. Ms. Nodar earned a gift certificate to childtherapytoys.com for her submission. Learn how you can do the same!

A respite to a world saturated in technology, the labyrinth offers a chance to literally stop and listen to one’s inner voice. Whether walking the labyrinth, building one in the sand, or drawing it in a piece of paper, the action requires concentration on the task at hand, which may be a welcome relief. Labyrinth scholars suggest we begin walking or building a labyrinth with the intention of gaining self-knowledge, but not to expect an answer. Rather than begin the journey with an expectation, they encourage us to embrace and honor the entire experience. Based on the idea that most, if not all children enjoy connecting the dots, the activity featured above lends itself to tapping into a child’s creative imagination. Chances…

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A “Crappy” Drawing

In my work as a creative arts therapist, I implement mindfulness-based practices that emphasize the importance of the inward journey; connecting with the mysterious and esoteric parts of the self. This involves meditation and art making, as a way of getting in touch with my “inner knowing.” I also happen to be finishing up a collaborative […]

via A “Crappy” Drawing — Creative Arts Therapies

Altered Books, Altered Self-Compassion — HAVEN Give Hope A Voice

Guest Blog by Anne Sutton, MA LPC, HAVEN – Counseling Program “Self-compassion is extending compassion to one’s self in instances of perceived inadequacy, failure, or general suffering.” – Dr. Kristen Neff, author of Self-Compassion Self-Compassion as a daily practice can be very difficult for survivors of intimate partner violence and sexual violence. Trauma alters our inner self-talk, […]

via Altered Books, Altered Self-Compassion — HAVEN Give Hope A Voice

Art Therapy Directive: vulnerability zoom

This has to be one of my favorite art therapy techniques.

The vulnerability zoom (original directive from inner canvas) is a process of art creation and uncovering the hidden layers of a work of art.

Here’s the basics on how it works:

  1. To begin: ask the client to create a work of art. When the client is finished, talk about the art they created.zoom-11.jpg

     

  2. Choose a spot to “zoom in” on. Imagine if we were to get a magnifying glass and view that specific spot. What would it look like?
    zoom-21.jpg
  3. Repeat step 2.

    zoom-31.jpg

    Artwork #3

  4. Repeat step 2 until the client feels it is the “right” time to stop. This process may go on for several sessions. And that is okay. 

 

Check out the full directive HERE. 

*All artwork shown is not client work.